Elaine White's Life in Books

The Author

 

Elaine White is the author of multi-genre MM romance, celebrating 'love is love' and offering diversity in both genre and character within her stories.

Growing up in a small town and fighting cancer in her early teens taught her that life is short and dreams should be pursued. She lives vicariously through her independent, and often hellion characters, exploring all possibilities within the romantic universe.

The Winner of two Watty Awards – Collector's Dream (An Unpredictable Life) and Hidden Gem (Faithfully) – and an Honourable Mention in 2016's Rainbow Awards (A Royal Craving) Elaine is a self-professed geek, reading addict, and a romantic at heart.

 

The Reviewer

 

I’m an author and reader, who just can’t get away from books. I discovered the MM genre a few years ago and became addicted.

Top #50 UK reviewer on Goodreads
#1 reviewer on Divine Magazine

A Son of the Sun by Fabien Nury,  Eric Henninot (Illustrator)
A Son of the Sun by Fabien Nury, Eric Henninot (Illustrator)

Parlay is the French king of a dying island tribe and the father of the sublime Armande. He’s selling his pearls, a fortune collected from his island’s lagoon. The wealthiest traders in the Solomon Islands have been invited to the auction, except for David Grief, the Englishman the natives call the Son of the Sun. Come hell or high water—probably both—Grief will be there. And he isn’t coming for the pearls.

 

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REVIEW

 

** I WAS GIVEN THIS BOOK FOR MY READING PLEASURE **
Copy received through Netgalley

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A Son of the Sun is based on Jack London novels. While I've never been a Jack London reader, I found this graphic novel to be beautifully illustrated, with that old-fashioned grit and colour of classic books, and well paced, with a great plot.

A Son of the Sun, by Fabian Nury
★★★★☆
80 Pages

Let's start with the simple stuff:

Would I read it again?: Yes!
Genre: Comic, Graphic Novel, Adventure
Content Warning: deals with alcoholism, gambling, slavery, suicide, racism


Now, let's get down to the nitty gritty:

David Grief is an interesting lead character. He has everything he could want at his disposal, wealth, respect, a business empire, but he has nothing really to live for since the woman he loved committed suicide. There are a whole host of other traders and sailors, but he's the main plot, and by far the most interesting.

There are hints that this “Parlay” character is the one bringing them all together, but that Grief is the only one not invited, and we don't really know why until they reach Parlay's island. The slow trickle of information and backstory was really well done, I loved the snippets of flashbacks and the hints that were littered throughout, but never too heavily relied on.

The writing style is great, for a graphic novel. It gives the same kind of detail and background as a novel could, but in a condensed form and keeping only to the bullet point facts that we need to know to follow the story. The plot was well paced and told a great story about the dangers of greed, lust, and love. About how pride could hurt yourself more than anyone else, in the end. And that last panel was a perfect ending.

The one fault I had – the reason it's not a 5 star review – is because the format of the pdf meant that it was hard to read. If it had been in comic form (cbr/cbz) then I could have used a comic reader to read each individual panel. However, that option wasn't available, so I had to enlarge the page, which meant that the page took a moment to adjust and sometimes didn't; I often ended up with blurry text that was hard to read, no matter how far I zoomed in. It made for a difficult reading experience and I missed a few speech bubbles, for the simple fact they were too small and too blurry to read, which, in the end, affected the flow and ease of reading.

However, the story still managed to come through, so I'd still read it again.

Although it's currently not available on paperback, I'd definitely buy it. I'm also going to get the original novel, and read that. This graphic novel was a great introduction to Jack London's work, for me, and I'm eager to read more from both this author and him.